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Park Tudor

Mary Zajac’s Books

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Mary Zajac – Science Teacher The Secret Life of Bees – Sue Monk Kidd Walker of Time – Helen Hughes Vick Peace Like a River – Leif Enger Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte Listen – Stephanie Tolan Killing Jesus – Bill O’Reilly The Man Who Listens to Horses – Monty Roberts Seabiscuit – Laura Hillenbrand Walker of Time by Helen Hughes Vick This Middle School adventure incorporates archaeology and the idea of time travel. I know everyone has wondered what it would have been like if you had lived in another era. Helen Hughes Vick captures the history and the Native American culture in this fast-paced reading. This is the first book in a trilogy centered around pre-Columbian Southwest North America. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd I remember how angry I was reading the book when the racism was being described. Family life can be difficult but having someone you trust can make anything manageable. Listen by Stephanie Tolan If you love dogs you will enjoy this read. There is a special relationship between dogs and humans. What if you have a dog that has been abused by humans? Can trust ever be developed? Find out…

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Doug Allen’s Books

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Doug Allen – Director of Development & Alumni Relations The Fever – Wallace Shawn Anathem – Neal Stephenson The Annotated Alice – Lewis Carroll Momo – Michael Ende The Republic – Plato Dune – Frank Herbert The Art of Learning – Josh Waitzkin The Fever by Wallace Shawn: This short story is written from the perspective of a traveler who has fallen ill in a foreign country. It is the sometimes disoriented and sometimes terribly lucid stream of consciousness of someone who feels unmoored from the familiar comforts of home and is confronting the moral horror that his comfortable life (and all our lives) depends on the exploitation and misery of other people. Very short, but very powerful. Here is a review of a performance of the play that gives a little more background. Anathem by Neil Stephenson: In addition to being a vast science fiction epic in a fully formed parallel world to ours, Anathem is combination of several genres: 1) sheltered monks have adventures in the secular world, and find that their training is unusually helpful in certain situations, 2) a philosophical meditation on the repercussions of quantum theory’s many-worlds hypothesis, and 3) an anthropological reflection on the difference between the mass-culture…

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Kathryn Lerch’s Books

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Kathryn Lerch – History Teacher and Legacy Initiative Coordinator If You Survive – George Wilson Iron Coffins – Commander Herbert A. Werner Sixpence House – Paul Collins Little America – Rajiv Chandrasekaran The Collapse – Mary Elise Sarotte Assignment to Hell – Timothy M. Gay I have always been fascinated with historical events or artifacts, thus much is logical about my short list of recommended books. It was very difficult to narrow this down, but thanks to some of my current students in Military History, a selection of books were ranked and the “final cut” determined. Typically I am reading two or three books at one time, but if one in particular grabs my attention—everything may be put aside so that I can read that book from start to finish. One example would be Rick Atkinson’s history, An Army at Dawn, which was the first in his invasion trilogy for WWII (2002). Having received the 700+ page book for Christmas, and having a week to spend in the mountains, I read from morning until night for five days. I could not put the book down, and since then have read his successor volumes. I hope that one or more of…

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Stefanie Dean’s Books

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Stefanie Dean – Graphic Designer/Photographer and Graphic Design Teacher City of Thieves – David Benioff Graphic Icons – John Clifford Print Workshop – Christine Schmidt Thinking With Type: A Critical Guide – Ellen Lupton Me Talk Pretty One Day – David Sedaris The Book Thief – Markus Zusak Steal Like An Artist – Austin Kleon I had a hard time narrowing down the books I chose. I could have added a hundred more. Novels: City of Thieves: During the Nazis’ brutal siege of Leningrad, Lev Beniov is arrested for looting and thrown into the same cell as a handsome deserter named Kolya. Instead of being executed, Lev and Kolya are given a shot at saving their own lives by complying with an outrageous directive: secure a dozen eggs for a powerful Soviet colonel to use in his daughter’s wedding cake. In a city cut off from all supplies and suffering unbelievable deprivation, Lev and Kolya embark on a hunt through the dire lawlessness of Leningrad and behind enemy lines to find the impossible. I am not a great reader. I start books, get halfway through and then put them down for months. I could not put this book down. The story…

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Sara Rogers’ Books

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Sara Rogers – Research & Information Specialist and English Teacher 100 Days of Real Food – Lisa Leake Salt Sugar Fat – Michael Moss The Taming of the Shrew – William Shakespeare The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon Revolution – Jennifer Donnelly My very first memories are of books and reading. We lived on a farm in the country so books filled the void of neighborhood playmates. The world of mystery was my first choice—I delighted in Nancy Drew’s sleuthing. That is reflected in The Shadow of the Wind, a tale of murder, madness, and love. While in college, I studied Shakespeare and found The Taming of the Shrew to be my favorite of his plays. I enjoy the story as well as the strong female character. Revolution is another story with a strong female character mixed with mystery and fantasy. Currently, I place a high priority on whole, clean eating largely due to my children’s food allergies. 100 Days of Real Food is a fabulous cookbook with easy recipes. Salt Sugar Fat opened my eyes to the way processed food is manufactured to manipulate consumers.

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Geoff Sharpless’ Books

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Geoff Sharpless – English Teacher Roget’s Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases Concise Etymological English Dictionary of the English Language – Rev. Walter W. Skeat The Fellowship of the Ring – J. R. R. Tolkien Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad The Road – Cormac McCarthy A Canticle for Leibowitz – Walter J. Miller Jr. Civilization and Its Discontents – Sigmund Freud Robinson Crusoe – Daniel Defoe Like most of the readers featured here, I might have assembled many other texts for this exercise, but tried to confine them to books that I enjoyed as a teenager – with the exception of the more recent McCarthy novel. This, in part, explains their masculine/heroic confines. Beyond that, I hesitate to opine what this particular set expresses – if my own rationale is part of this interesting exercise. I can identify a dark theme: Mordor is not just closer than we might wish, but its savage energies inhabit us. This said, the novels here also reveal human (or Hobbit) strength prevailing against the gloom, or, perhaps, the value of dying heroically – by which one often means, ironically. I might hazard, if I had to try to spin around and see myself,…

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Paul Hamer’s Books

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Paul Hamer – English Teacher Salmon Fishing in the Yemen – Paul Torday A River Runs Through It – Norman Maclean Saints of Big Harbour – Lynn Coady Waterland – Graham Swift The River Why – David James Duncan Winterdance – Gary Paulsen On the Rez – Jan Frazier For some reason, images of water and fishing have always resonated with me, perhaps beginning with the little pond in the woods across the street from the house I grew up in, a body of water where I spent many hours of my childhood. If it had been entirely up to me, for example, I would have written my dissertation on Moby-Dick, perhaps the ultimate expression of that longing. Thus, a list of some of my favorite books looks pretty soggy. I would also have to say that they are favorites not because they are the greatest books ever written (Anna Karenina, etc., would be on that list) but because they made my eyes watery, as well, either from laughter (Winterdance) or loss (A River Runs Through It). Another concern that resonates with me is bad teaching, and you will find portraits of bad teachers in both Waterland and Saints of…

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