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Park Tudor

Laura Schroeder’s Books

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Laura Schroeder – Fine Arts Teacher Childhood’s End – Arthur C. Clarke The Sea Around Us – Rachel L. Carson All Creature Great and Small – James Herriot Very Good, Jeeves! – P.G. Woodhouse On the Road – Jack Kerouac Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel – Andrew Graham-Dixon Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain – Betty Edwards I have a strong emotional connection to reading (before I could read myself, my mom read to me three times a day, and even now my husband reads to me almost nightly), and a practical, physical connection to books (I have handled them as a job at various times, in two different public library systems and at a publishing company warehouse). But when I think of myself as a reader, I have to say that the most magical thing about books is discovering by browsing. Browsing is accomplished while parked in front of a shelf or pile of books. Although you can’t judge a book by its cover, you can be attracted to the texture, shape, weight, design, and title of a book as evidenced by its spine, front, and even back covers. When you see a book that appeals to…

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Ryan Martin’s Books

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Ryan Martin – Upper School Assistant Director and English Teacher Brief Encounters With Che Guevara – Ben Fountain The Angel Esmeralda – Don DeLillo Red Ant House – Ann Cummins Chemistry and Other Stories – Ron Rash Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned – Walter Mosley King’s Refrigerator – Charles Johnson The Torturer’s Apprentice – John Biguenet Malgudi Days – R. K. Narayan Lost in the City – Edward P. Jones Lost Names – Richard Kim My childhood home was not a place of books beyond those cataloging generations of recipes.  That said, it was a residence for storytellers.  Many times after a meal the television couldn’t keep up as family and friends made seemingly common tales vivid in our minds like unbroken daydreams. I sense those dining table moments, brief yet layered accounts of Midwestern life, laid the foundation for my attraction to short stories.  Doug Hoffert, my sixth grade teacher, soon (I sense knowingly) cemented that passion when he gave me my first anthology of American short stories. However, as an undergrad, I had tired of rereading the canonical stories required by my professors.  Though I appreciate Kate Chopin, if I had to read the line “…of the joy that kills” one more time…

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Seth Risinger’s Books

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Seth Risinger – Math Teacher The Alchemist – Paulo Coelho Freakonomics – Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner Game of Thrones – George R. R. Martin Outliers – Malcolm Gladwell The Road – Cormac McCarthy The Martian – Andy Weir I am always quick to find a new interest, hobby, or topic to pursue. I want to immerse myself in the material, information, and world created by the authors. Whether it be a book about mathematics (I know, very cliche) or the possibility of life on Mars, reading allows my mind to grow, my imagination to swell, and my interests to multiply. Here are a few of my favorite books: Game of Thrones While the television show has ridden a meteoric climb in popularity, the original book is what started it all. When I first read it, I didn’t know much about the premise of the story. Before long, I was knee deep in the exciting and complex plot of betrayal, political intrigue, and the plotting of war. Martin’s writing makes you feel as though you are one of the Starks. You learn to love the family, their home, and their morals. Unfortunately, Martin makes it tough to care…

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Mark Dewart’s Books

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Mark Dewart – Upper School Science Teacher The Rediscovery of North America – Barry Lopez Canoeing with the Cree – Eric Sevareid My Life as an Indian – J.W. Schultz Young Men and Fire – Norman Maclean My Antonia – Willa Cather Fools Crow – James Welch Great Plains – Ian Frazier Oregon Trail – Francis Parkman Undaunted Courage – Stephen E. Ambrose In the movie “Dances With Wolves,” the fictional character, Lieutenant John Dunbar, is rewarded for his Civil War heroism by being offered a post to any location of his choosing. With the opportunity to go anywhere, Dunbar makes a request that seems incomprehensible to those who hear it. Dunbar asks to be transferred to an obscure outpost out on the Great Plains because, he says, “I want to see the frontier. Before it is gone.” All of these stories are about people, often young people, going to the great North American frontiers, the endless sea of grass that extended west of the Mississippi to the Rocky Mountains or the Boreal Forest that stretches north to Hudson Bay. These are the books you want to read in the months leading up to a family trip to the National Parks…

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Pam Fischer’s Books

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Pam Fischer – Upper School English Teacher The Devil the White City – Eric Larson The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less – Barry Schwartz Hamlet’s BlackBerry – William Powers The Power Of Now – Eckhart Tolle Scarcity – Sendhill, Mullainathan & Eldar Shafir I grew up in a family of readers. For as long as I can remember, my mother had a stack of anywhere from five to twenty books stacked on a long coffee table in front of her couch, and she consumed them methodically. They moved from coffee table to a variety of canvas bags always at the ready for our multiple trips to the library. My father’s “library” resided behind the toilet, and he was not to be disturbed when he was reading. My older brother who hated school as a teenager died with a library far vaster than mine, and my library residing in custom-built shelves in my living room is a focal point in my home. I thought my family was normal. I thought every family consumed books like others slam through a bag of popcorn or a sleeve of Oreos. These books are all primers on human behavior. One of my favorite texts…

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Cory Scott’s Books

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Cory Scott – Upper School English Teacher Blood Meridian – Cormac McCarthy The Great Railway Bazaar – Paul Theroux Homage to Catalonia – George Orwell The Sun Also Rises – Ernest Hemingway The Zombie Survival Guide – Max Brooks The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkein The Pillars of the Earth – Ken Follett Lonesome Dove – Larry McMurtry A good friend of mine, who is much better educated and much wider read, once described Blood Meridian as, “word for word, sentence for sentence, paragraph for paragraph, the best American novel ever written.” A bold claim but notice he didn’t mention the plot, which really doesn’t stand up to other great American novels. (It’s alarmingly linear.) Call it what he may, I count Blood Meridian among my absolute favorite books. I can say definitively that I’ve lent this book to more friends than any other I own. It’s the story of the Kid who wanders the American West in the late 1800s in the company of an incredibly violent group of bounty hunters. Reader beware: while Blood Meridian is beautifully written, it is graphic in its depiction of the violence that characterized our nation at that time. Three others by Cormac McCarthy…

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Dr. Sven Dubie’s Books

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Dr. Sven Dubie – History Department Chair, History Teacher, and Interim Director of Diversity Promised Land – Jay Parini Several Short Sentences About Writing – Verlyn Klinkenborg Winter – Adam Gopnik Invisible Man – Ralph Ellison To Serve God And Wal-Mart – Bethany Moreton Angry White Men – Michael Kimmel She’s Not There – Jennifer Finney Boylan Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention – Manning Marable My love for reading emerged somewhat later in life—probably at the time I was in college, which coincided with the awakening of my own intellectual abilities and curiosity. Nevertheless, I was fortunate to grow up in a home with books, and to have parents who steadily encouraged my reading habit—even if that meant finding another book in the Hardy Boys Series, which fueled my ambition, for a time, to become an FBI agent. My interests are eclectic and tend to reflect a particular passion of the moment—though some of my selections also represent deeper dives into long-standing interests. My emerging work on diversity issues at Park Tudor has inspired me to broaden the scope of my literary foraging, so I included a work from Jhumpa Lahiri (The Namesake), who is a contemporary master exploring…

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