Stefanie Dean’s Books

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Stefanie Dean – Graphic Designer/Photographer and Graphic Design Teacher City of Thieves – David Benioff Graphic Icons – John Clifford Print Workshop – Christine Schmidt Thinking With Type: A Critical Guide – Ellen Lupton Me Talk Pretty One Day – David Sedaris The Book Thief – Markus Zusak Steal Like An Artist – Austin Kleon I had a hard time narrowing down the books I chose. I could have added a hundred more. Novels: City of Thieves: During the Nazis’ brutal siege of Leningrad, Lev Beniov is arrested for looting and thrown into the same cell as a handsome deserter named Kolya. Instead of being executed, Lev and Kolya are given a shot at saving their own lives by complying with an outrageous directive: secure a dozen eggs for a powerful Soviet colonel to use in his daughter’s wedding cake. In a city cut off from all supplies and suffering unbelievable deprivation, Lev and Kolya embark on a hunt through the dire lawlessness of Leningrad and behind enemy lines to find the impossible. I am not a great reader. I start books, get halfway through and then put them down for months. I could not put this book down. The story…

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Sara Rogers’ Books

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Sara Rogers – Research & Information Specialist and English Teacher 100 Days of Real Food – Lisa Leake Salt Sugar Fat – Michael Moss The Taming of the Shrew – William Shakespeare The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon Revolution – Jennifer Donnelly My very first memories are of books and reading. We lived on a farm in the country so books filled the void of neighborhood playmates. The world of mystery was my first choice—I delighted in Nancy Drew’s sleuthing. That is reflected in The Shadow of the Wind, a tale of murder, madness, and love. While in college, I studied Shakespeare and found The Taming of the Shrew to be my favorite of his plays. I enjoy the story as well as the strong female character. Revolution is another story with a strong female character mixed with mystery and fantasy. Currently, I place a high priority on whole, clean eating largely due to my children’s food allergies. 100 Days of Real Food is a fabulous cookbook with easy recipes. Salt Sugar Fat opened my eyes to the way processed food is manufactured to manipulate consumers.

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Geoff Sharpless’ Books

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Geoff Sharpless – English Teacher Roget’s Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases Concise Etymological English Dictionary of the English Language – Rev. Walter W. Skeat The Fellowship of the Ring – J. R. R. Tolkien Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad The Road – Cormac McCarthy A Canticle for Leibowitz – Walter J. Miller Jr. Civilization and Its Discontents – Sigmund Freud Robinson Crusoe – Daniel Defoe Like most of the readers featured here, I might have assembled many other texts for this exercise, but tried to confine them to books that I enjoyed as a teenager – with the exception of the more recent McCarthy novel. This, in part, explains their masculine/heroic confines. Beyond that, I hesitate to opine what this particular set expresses – if my own rationale is part of this interesting exercise. I can identify a dark theme: Mordor is not just closer than we might wish, but its savage energies inhabit us. This said, the novels here also reveal human (or Hobbit) strength prevailing against the gloom, or, perhaps, the value of dying heroically – by which one often means, ironically. I might hazard, if I had to try to spin around and see myself,…

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Paul Hamer’s Books

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Paul Hamer – English Teacher Salmon Fishing in the Yemen – Paul Torday A River Runs Through It – Norman Maclean Saints of Big Harbour – Lynn Coady Waterland – Graham Swift The River Why – David James Duncan Winterdance – Gary Paulsen On the Rez – Jan Frazier For some reason, images of water and fishing have always resonated with me, perhaps beginning with the little pond in the woods across the street from the house I grew up in, a body of water where I spent many hours of my childhood. If it had been entirely up to me, for example, I would have written my dissertation on Moby-Dick, perhaps the ultimate expression of that longing. Thus, a list of some of my favorite books looks pretty soggy. I would also have to say that they are favorites not because they are the greatest books ever written (Anna Karenina, etc., would be on that list) but because they made my eyes watery, as well, either from laughter (Winterdance) or loss (A River Runs Through It). Another concern that resonates with me is bad teaching, and you will find portraits of bad teachers in both Waterland and Saints of…

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Laura Schroeder’s Books

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Laura Schroeder – Fine Arts Teacher Childhood’s End – Arthur C. Clarke The Sea Around Us – Rachel L. Carson All Creature Great and Small – James Herriot Very Good, Jeeves! – P.G. Woodhouse On the Road – Jack Kerouac Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel – Andrew Graham-Dixon Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain – Betty Edwards I have a strong emotional connection to reading (before I could read myself, my mom read to me three times a day, and even now my husband reads to me almost nightly), and a practical, physical connection to books (I have handled them as a job at various times, in two different public library systems and at a publishing company warehouse). But when I think of myself as a reader, I have to say that the most magical thing about books is discovering by browsing. Browsing is accomplished while parked in front of a shelf or pile of books. Although you can’t judge a book by its cover, you can be attracted to the texture, shape, weight, design, and title of a book as evidenced by its spine, front, and even back covers. When you see a book that appeals to…

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