Dr. Sven Dubie’s Books

By | Reading | No Comments

Dr. Sven Dubie – History Department Chair, History Teacher, and Interim Director of Diversity Promised Land – Jay Parini Several Short Sentences About Writing – Verlyn Klinkenborg Winter – Adam Gopnik Invisible Man – Ralph Ellison To Serve God And Wal-Mart – Bethany Moreton Angry White Men – Michael Kimmel She’s Not There – Jennifer Finney Boylan Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention – Manning Marable My love for reading emerged somewhat later in life—probably at the time I was in college, which coincided with the awakening of my own intellectual abilities and curiosity. Nevertheless, I was fortunate to grow up in a home with books, and to have parents who steadily encouraged my reading habit—even if that meant finding another book in the Hardy Boys Series, which fueled my ambition, for a time, to become an FBI agent. My interests are eclectic and tend to reflect a particular passion of the moment—though some of my selections also represent deeper dives into long-standing interests. My emerging work on diversity issues at Park Tudor has inspired me to broaden the scope of my literary foraging, so I included a work from Jhumpa Lahiri (The Namesake), who is a contemporary master exploring…

Read More
Peter Kraft's Book Recommendations

Peter Kraft’s Books

By | Reading | No Comments

Peter Kraft – Interim Head of School The Fire Next Time – James Baldwin The Wasteland – T.S. Eliot The Ascent of Money – Niall Ferguson Gravity’s Rainbow – Thomas Pynchon The Worldly Philosophers – Robert L. Heilbroner Tales of the Alhambra – Washington Irving My books are an expression of my interest in social change and a sense of creating a new “place” from challenge and adversity. From T.S. Eliot to the Grapes of Wrath, all of these books are situated in periods of change, strife, and ultimate triumph. As you read one of these books, I would love to begin with you a dialogue on one or more of the following questions: How is a sense of “place” so critical in one or more of these texts? In particular, does the protagonist make the place, or does the place make the protagonist? Secondly, to what extent is the place in this work a hindrance or a help? Lastly, if you were to write a book, in what context/place would you situated? What does this say about you and your sense of adventure and life lived? Enjoy!

Read More

Liz Odmark’s Books

By | Reading | No Comments

Liz Odmark – Middle School English Teacher A Hope in the Unseen – Ron Suskind A Girl Named Zippy – Haven Kimmel Watership Down – Richard Adams A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving Nickel and Dimed – Barbara Ehrenreich Peace Like a River – Leif Enger Nervous Conditions – Tsitsi Dangarembga Feed – M.T. Anderson Most of my selections feature fascinating characters or individuals. Readers will not soon forget the desperation of fictional Jeremiah Land in Peace Like A River, the perseverance of Tambu in Nervous Conditions, or the extraordinary friendship of the damaged, spiritual Owen Meany. Nervous Conditions offers readers authentic perspectives on African culture, gender roles, the value of education, and student stress. It is comforting and a bit disturbing to note how different Tambu’s life is from mine but how familiar her life lessons are. A Prayer for Owen Meany is a suitable book to acquaint younger readers with John Irving’s creative genius. Any novel that can combine topics such as physical disability, baseball, a messiah complex, and an armadillo is worth more than a passing glance. Improbably, Peace Like a River features an escape, a quest, an asthmatic narrator, and a few miracles. I have never visited the states where the novel…

Read More

Jane Sidey’s Books

By | Reading | No Comments

Jane Sidey – Middle School English Collected Poems – Philip Larkin The Ghost Map – Steven Johnson The Autobiography Of Miss Jane Pittman – Ernest J. Gaines March – Geraldine Brooks A Room With A View – E.M.Forster Native Guard – Natasha Tretheway The Poetry Home Repair Manual – Ted Kooser Downhome: An Anthology Of Southern Women Writers – Ed. Susie Mee Interpreter Of Maladies – Jhumpa Lahiri I was encouraged, dare I say forced, to become a reader at an early age. I think many only children are. For birthdays, I was typically given novels and activity books (Rainy Day Crafts was an ironically British title that graced my shelf when I was about seven). I think the adults in my life felt that books would somehow support me in my siblingless isolation and, more importantly, stop me from bothering my parents. So, reading always felt like an essential and necessary component of life than a choice. In college, I studied Chaucer, Dante, Gower, Boccaccio and Langland and the world they inhabited. My fondness for mediaeval literature and history isn’t overt these days, but it certainly informs the overarching themes present in this list. Like the pilgrims in The Canterbury Tales, and the narrator of Piers Plowman, so…

Read More